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Deer Antler Velvet and Arthritis

For thousands of years, deer antler velvet has been used in traditional medicine of many cultures for treatment of different health conditions. Today, this ingredient has a special role in alternative medicine as it allows users to support their health naturally.

Deer Antler Velvet and Arthritis

Arthritis is an inflammation of joints indicated by pain, discomfort, stiffness, and swelling in some cases. There is no cure that would make arthritis go away, but patients are often prescribed medications to manage their condition successfully. Deer antler velvet is a great addition to your standard arthritis treatment.

In one study, the supplementation with deer antler velvet of 215g a day proved to be effective in the management of rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. Scientists concluded that deer antler velvet can be consumed safely in conjunction with other rheumatoid arthritis medications[1], but they also stress the importance of more studies on this subject.

The most common type of arthritis is osteoarthritis affecting more than 300,000 New Zealanders[2]. Osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease occurs when cartilage (cushion between joints) breaks down and causes pain, stiffness, swelling, and pain. Scientists from the Massey University found that supplementation with deer antler velvet shows potential in the treatment of symptoms associated with osteoarthritis[3].

Even though everyone can develop this condition, it usually affects individuals between 25 and 50. Women are three times more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis than men[4].

The Beneficial Components:

Collagen

Deer antler velvet is a rich source of bioactive substances such as collagen. Collagen is defined as a long-chain amino acid and the most prevalent protein in a human body. Collagen is found in skin, muscles, bones, blood vessels, tendons, and digestive system. A growing body of evidence confirms that collagen plays a vital role in the prevention of degenerative joint diseases[5]. Collagen also shows potential in the treatment of osteoarthritis and osteoporosis without inducing side effects[6].

Prostaglandins

Prostaglandins are bioactive substances found in deer antler velvet. They are found in most tissues and organs because prostaglandins are produced by almost all nucleated cells. Prostaglandins play a role in inflammation and the body’s response to it[7], which is important because arthritis is the inflammation of joints. Evidence shows that prostaglandins are effective mediators in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis, which is why they are important therapeutic tools in the management of the condition[8].

GAGs

Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are bioactive substances found in deer antler velvet and their function is to maintain collagen. GAGs, particularly chondroitin, exhibit an anti-inflammatory effect. Chondroitin has been used for decades in the treatment of osteoarthritis due to anti-inflammatory, anti-catabolic, antioxidant, and anti-apoptotic effects. What makes chondroitin practical for arthritis sufferers is that it doesn’t interact with other drugs and doesn’t cause side effects[9].

Mucopolysaccharides

This component is a building block of joint cartilage and through deer antler velvet supplementation you can effectively support cartilage-building and restore joint elasticity.

NutriNZ Deer Antler Velvet

Deer Antler Velvet from NutriNZ is an effective and safe product for men and women who deal with joint pain and arthritis. It is a rich source of numerous bioactive components all of which help to support and improve joint health both in terms of short term pain relief and long term regeneration and strengthening.

Regular intake of the supplement alleviates pain, discomfort, and improves range of motion without discomfort and side effects.

Furthermore, in New Zealand, deer velvet removal is classed as a surgical procedure, each procedure being monitored and supervised by a veterinarian that is licensed and trained by the National Velvetting Standards Body (NVSB). These procedures are performed in government-licensed facilities in compliance with a strict code of practice that confirms these animals are unharmed and that essential hygiene standards are followed.

Mentioned in this Article

References

[1] Allen M, Oberle K, Grace M, Russell A. Elk velvet antler in rheumatoid arthritis: Phase II trial. Biological Research for Nursing 2002 Jan, vol. 3 no. 3, 111-118. Doi: 10.1177/1099800402003003001 http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1099800402003003001

[2] Osteoarthritis: symptoms, diagnosis, treatment Southern Cross https://www.southerncross.co.nz/group/medical-library/osteoarthritis-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment

[3] Gilbey A, Perezgonzalez JD. Health benefits of deer and elk velvet antler supplements: a systematic review of randomised controlled studies. New Zealand Medical Journal 2012 Dec 14;125(1367):80-6 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23321886

[5] Bello AE, Oesser S. Collagen hydrolysate for the treatment of osteoarthritis and other joint disorders: a review of the literature. Current Medical Research and Opinion 2006 Nov;22(11):2221-32. Doi: 10.1185/030079906X148373 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17076983

[6] Moskowitz RW. Role of collagen hydrolysate in bone and joint disease. Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism 2000 Oct;30(2):87-99. Doi: 10.1053/sarh.2000.9622 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11071580

[7] Ricciotti E, FitzGerald GA. Prostaglandins and Inflammation. Arteriosclerosis, thrombosis, and vascular biology. 2011;31(5):986-1000. doi:10.1161/ATVBAHA.110.207449. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3081099/

[8] Fattahi MJ, Mirshafiey A. Prostaglandins and rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis 2012 Oct. Doi: 10.1155/2012/239310 https://www.hindawi.com/journals/arthritis/2012/239310/

[9] Henrotin Y, Mathy M, Sanchez C, Lambert C. Chondroitin Sulfate in the Treatment of Osteoarthritis: From in Vitro Studies to Clinical Recommendations. Therapeutic Advances in Musculoskeletal Disease. 2010;2(6):335-348. doi:10.1177/1759720X10383076. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3383492/